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Jeff Moody

Jeff Moody

Mr. Moody has a B.S. degree in criminal justice from Indiana University, Bloomington. He has taken the Certified Legal Video Specialist course from the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA). In addition to attending many national and state association conventions, he has evaluated schools for the Accrediting Commission for Independent Colleges and Schools, and he served periodically on the ACICS Intermediate Review Committee (IRC) for school accreditations. Mr. Moody was awarded NCRA's Council on Approved Student Education (CASE) Award of Excellence to an Outstanding Educator in 2006. In addition to attending many professional development seminars through NCRA, he has served on several committees and and wa chair of CASE. He has been a independent certified trainer Case CATalyst®, RapidWrite Pro®, and CaseView II® and trained on other machine shorthand software programs. In 2009, Mr. Moody developed ev360, a learning management system and related technologies designed to assist students and faculty in court reporting education.  Mr. Moody is currently developing a new "patent pending" speed building method that will be part of a new software program called ev360 Ultimate.

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CCR Student Shines as October's Alumni Spotlight

Josh Foley

  1. Where do you currently reside (city,state)?
    Right now I’m in Denver, CO but am moving to Washington, DC at the end of October.
  2. Why did you decide to come to court reporting school?
    I was looking for a new career and happened to find CCR while I was searching online.
  3. What did you do before court reporting school (other jobs, schools, etc.)?
    I was a flight attendant seven years while in school. I was fortunate to take advantage of the travel benefits, but I sure don’t miss the job. Before that I earned a Bachelor’s degree in Spanish.
  4. What date did you start court reporting school?
    February 4, 2008. I finished January 28, 2011.
  5. What made you choose CCR?
    Due to my job being a flight attendant, onsite wasn’t an option. I was very impressed with CCR when looking at schools, so it was an easy decision to make. I’m glad I did!
  6. What are your strengths/weaknesses?
    I think I’m a good writer and do a good job; however, I’m a huge procrastinator and often put off things longer than I should. I’d like to be more organized too.
  7. What was your biggest challenge?
    School was definitely difficult, especially getting through the high speeds, but it’s definitely a tie between finishing school and starting to actually work.
  8. What motivated you to complete the program?
    I think the SAPs (minute by minute tests) couldn’t have come at a better time. Testing minute by minute definitely helped motivate me. Also just the fact I wanted to be done with it. When that happened I really went for it, stopped making excuses, and made it happen.
  9. What advice would you give to other court reporting students?
    Get out of your comfort zone, get something for everything, and aggressively speedbuild. Speedbuilding is not supposed to be a pleasant experience! If all you do is write at controlled speeds and straight copy, you won’t gain speed.
  10. Do you currently have a job? If yes, what do you do?
    I’ve been a captioner for over a year, but I’ll be doing full-time CART in Washington DC for local and federal government as well as for classes, meetings, and seminars. I’ll still continue to caption part time.
  11. How did you find your current job?
    Through networking at a NCRA convention.
  12. What are your future plans? What certifications do you plan on earning?
    I plan on staying in Washington DC and continuing to do full-time CART. I plan on getting my CCP, CBC, and finishing the last leg of the RPR.
  13. Are you a member of any associations? If so, which associations? If not, do you plan on joining any associations? If so, which associations?
    NCRA. I’ll be joining the local association in Washington DC as well.
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  • Brandy Hernandez
    Brandy Hernandez says #
    Good luck on making your dreams a reality, Dylan! I am a beginner student at CCR and am struggling a bit esp. with the speedbuild

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CCR Student Earns Scholarship

Hobart, IN -- College of Court Reporting would like to congratulate Margaret Abernathy, a recent recipient of a Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association Scholarship. The funds were awarded during the convention which took place Saturday, September 28th. In order to receive this award, the students had to submit an essay to the board. This year the scholarship was split between two entries. Congratulations, Margaret! We are proud of you!

If you are interested in more information regarding the ISRA, then please click below and visit their website!

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We have made it to round 2! Yes, the second round of the Intuit, Small Business Big Game, contest! This is very exciting!! After this round, the field narrows to 20 businesses.

We have an opportunity to run a 30 second commercial during the Super Bowl in 2014! Click on the link below and vote for us! By doing so, you will help us continue our efforts to make dreams come true!

Click Here!

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Jade started with CCR in Theory learning the Moody Method in September 2009. Jade graduated in February 2013 after 10 semesters. She currently works as an Official Court Reporter in Illinois.

  1. Why did you decide to come to court reporting school?
    I decided to pursue court reporting school after a high school teacher recommended the profession. I exceled with typing on the computer keyboard, and she thought this would be a great career path for me. She arranged for a representative from a local court reporting college to meet with me, and it was after this meeting that I was confident with my career choice.
  2. What did you do before court reporting school? (other jobs, schools, etc.)
    Throughout my high school years, I waitressed at a small restaurant and worked as a receptionist at a tanning salon. I continued waitressing throughout my attendance at CCR. Towards the end of my court reporting education, I accepted a job as a legal secretary at law firm.
  3. What date did you start court reporting school?
    I began court reporting school during the start of the College of Court Reporting’s fall semester in 2009. I believe this was in September.
  4. What made you choose CCR?
    I was enrolled and planned to start at Sparks Business College in Shelbyville, Illinois in August of 2009. A week before I was scheduled to begin my classes, I received a phone call informing me that the school was closing. However, they were kind enough to offer recommendations to other court reporting schools. After reviewing two online programs, I decided to choose CCR.
  5. What are your strengths/weaknesses?
    I believe one of my strengths is my tenacity. Although there were several times that I wanted to give up, I would never allow myself to do so. Also, I am a positive person. This optimism helped to get me through the rough patches in my education. To get a little more steno specific, I believe I am good with briefs. I can make connections quickly and easily, which is very helpful when making briefs on the fly. My weakness throughout school was completing enough practice hours. Now that I am a working reporter, I have found that my biggest weakness is speaking up. Judges and attorneys are very intimidating, and this makes interruptions very difficult.
  6. What was your biggest challenge?
    Without a doubt, my biggest challenge was definitely making myself practice. As an online student, I believe this became an even bigger issue. No one really knew if I spent the required amount of time on my machine. I was completely liable for my practice schedule. I was not very good with practicing in the beginning of my schooling. However, I am proud to say that I am better with this now. There is absolutely no way around this; court reporters must practice. What we learn is a skill and must be used often.
  7. What motivated you to complete the program?
    While I give those closest to me a lot of credit for their support during my education, I believe my biggest form of motivation came from within myself. I struggled more towards the beginning of the program than towards the end. Once I realized that I was the only one responsible for my lack of improvement, I was able to buckle down and get serious about speedbuilding. I knew what I wanted, and I knew what I had to do to get it done in the quickest time possible: practice, practice, practice! People often say that court reporters all share common personality traits. I believe this is what sets us apart from everyone else. We possess the determination and drive it takes to complete such a demanding program.
  8. What advice would you give to other court reporting students?
    The best piece of advice I can offer is to stick with it. No one really knows what a court reporter goes through unless he/she is a reporter or is training to be a reporter. There were many times during my schooling that I literally could not see myself accomplishing my goal. Although it is tough to work at something that seems so far away, the feelings of accomplishment and success at the end justify all of the long hours spent on the machine.
  9. Do you currently have a job? If yes, what do you do?
    Yes, I do. I am an Official Court Reporter for the Sixth Judicial Circuit in Illinois. I work in Decatur, Macon County. For the first six months of my career, I have been assigned to a control room and am in charge of monitoring the digital recording system throughout the ten courtrooms. After I am well acquainted with the court procedures and my six months are up, I will be put in a rotation with the other court reporters.
  10. How did you find your current job?
    In my state, Illinois, it is possible to work as an official reporter before passing the CSR. This becomes possible after the reporter passes the A Exam, which is dictated at slower speeds than the CSR. The reporter can only take the A Exam once he/she has been offered a position as an official reporter. Once the reporter has passed this exam, he/she works with a restricted license. This means that he/she can report for any courthouse that utilizes a digital recording system as a form of back up. I was unaware of this procedure until my mentor made the suggestion during my internship. She thought it would be a good idea for me to apply to several courthouses in our area that were hiring. At my first interview, I ended up meeting a nice girl named Jaclyn. She later advised me that her courthouse, Macon County, was looking to hire a new reporter. I applied for the position, interviewed, and then passed my A Exam before beginning my new job on October 1, 2012.
  11. What are your future plans? What certifications do you plan on earning?
    Since the beginning of my education, I have viewed the position of an official reporter as my ultimate goal. I was and still am completely astounded that this happened so quickly for me. I plan to work as an official until my retirement. Because there are pay raises for realtime certification, I would like to obtain this as well. I have not yet passed the skills portions of the CSR, so that is first on my list. I am scheduled for the April exam, so I hope to see positive results then! In addition to the CSR, I plan on acquiring the RPR. After the RPR, I want to try for the CRR.
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  • Lisa Morton
    Lisa Morton says #
    I am so proud of you, Jade! You finished school in 10 semesters. That is just outstanding! And, you jumped right into your new

Posted by on in CCR Articles

College of Court Reporting would like to congratulate nine alumni who are Professional Scholarship recipients. The funds were made available through a grant from the US Department of Education's Training for Realtime Writers (TRTW) program. Way to go grads!

Here’s how some of them are going to use the money:

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  • Lisa Morton
    Lisa Morton says #
    Way to go, graduates! May you continue to improve your skill and stay on top of technology!!!

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Moodle makes it easy to keep track of your course’s online discussions by using email notifications.  However, improper settings can result in too many emails.  This handout will show you how to control these notifications, and keep your inbox uncluttered.

There are two places where you need to keep track of your settings: your personal profile settings that control settings for all of your classes and individual forums you want to follow.

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People frequently ask: How did I start a school with three students in my home, and how did it become the best court reporting program in the country? The answer is that it was not planned, it just happened. Although the College of Court Reporting officially became a school in 1984, the beginning goes back a few years before that.

When I was in high school, my dad insisted that I learn Gregg shorthand. I was so fascinated with it that I decided to work as secretary when I graduated; but after a year, I felt I wanted more education and went to Indiana University where I graduated with a bachelor's degree, majoring in vocational education and English. I taught high school for a few years while my husband was in law school. After he finished school and began practicing, I stayed home until 1976 when our youngest child went to school. I didn't want to return to teach high school; and my husband, a state court judge at that time, brought home a little machine -- something his court reporter used that was a form of shorthand. Wow! I was impressed. I had always loved shorthand and typing and "machine steno" looked fascinating; therefore, I immediately enrolled in a local court reporting school.

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  • Sue Harrison
    Sue Harrison says #
    Kay, what an incredible career you've had. I just assumed you were a court reporter who decided to teach. I didn't realize the e
  • Rachelle Cahoon
    Rachelle Cahoon says #
    Kay, I enjoyed reading this history of my school! Thank you for sharing. This article just shows what I have already learned thr

Hobart, IN---The National Court Reporter Association held their annual convention during the second weekend of August in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Among the various court reporting vendors, schools, and professionals, College of Court Reporting had the greatest representation of students and faculty.  Their forty-plus attendees made their presence known throughout the convention hall as they demonstrated new technologies and handed out free T-shirts. Approximately 20 percent of the students in attendance at the national convention were College of Court Reporting students.

The focus of the College's attendance at the convention was to promote the school's newly offered ev360 Professional technologies to students, schools, and professionals.  ev360 Professional offers students, schools, and working reporters the opportunity to practice and advance their skill using LIVE and recorded virtual classes, thousands of hours of audio and text practice at speeds up to 350 words per minute, over 7,400 evaluations, and the ability to create practice material and share it publicly.  ev360 Professional contains the largest library of practice material for court reporting students and professionals.

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CCR is very proud to announce that ev360 Infinity 2.0 has officially launched. In 2.0, you can mark your dictation materials, record audio OR video dictation, and upload it directly into the learning management system. No additional audio or video recording software is necessary. Just accept the Java plugin certificate and you are on you way. The first of it kind for court reporting skill development. Next week we begin recording our multi-voice classes. Who has the best technology? This is exciting stuff.

 

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We are typically led to believe that being “nervous” is a bad thing. Indeed, most of the advice I’ve ever heard has been aimed at reducing anxiety. Over the years, I tried everything I could to get rid of the unpleasant feelings associated with performance anxiety. I tried eating bananas, drinking chamomile tea, imagining the audience in their underwear, sleep deprivation, practicing more, taking various supplements, and even trying to convince myself that it didn’t matter how I played. None of this, of course, took the anxiety away or did much to help me perform any better.

The big question, of course, is how do you transform anxiety from a liability to an advantage? Before we talk about this, we first need to understand some basics about what happens to our mind under stress.

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  • Ronin Athletics
    Ronin Athletics says #
    Clarity of mind and focus are especially important in the practice of martial arts. The disciplin helps you to harness the power o

College of Court Reporting (CCR) is pleased to announce that we will be exhibiting at the NCRA 2012 Annual Convention and Exposition August 9th – 12th in Philadelphia.  More than 1,800 court reporters, broadcast captioners, CART providers, webcasters, Internet information reporters, students, instructors, and scopists will attend the convention.

Janet Noel, Faculty Development Coordinator; Nicky Rodriquez, Director of Admissions; Natalie Kijurna, Graduate and Employer Relations Coordinator; Lisa Morton, Director of Financial Aid; Tim Moody, Instructor and Moody Method Theory Specialist; and Nick Trottier, Admissions Coordinator will represent CCR at the vendor exposition. We are pleased to announce that we will be demonstrating our ev360 Academic and ev360 Professional technologies. The ev360 suite of products were developed by the minds of some of the country's top court reporting educators and have played a vital role for users in enhancing skill and speed development, increasing progression rates, perfecting realtime skills, and passing certification skills exams. For those who participate in an ev360 Professional demonstration, we will be offering a free ev360 Professional T-shirt and a chance to win 5 Ben Franklins -- yes, $500.

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Confidently, we can say that court reporting--having a human court reporter preserve the spoken word in a courtroom, classroom, or elsewhere--is in fact a thriving field.  Yes, technology has made incredible advances in speech to text technology, but there are still no signs of an electronic device that can perform every necessary task that a human reporter can. There are a few prime reasons that we cite for the necessity of court reporters.

First, if you have ever been in a crowded area like an airport, mall, or bus station, you know that it is impossible to hear and comprehend everyone's conversations all at once.  However, the human ear accomplishes a feat that no machine is yet capable of.  You have the ability to home in on just one conversation out of the entire crowd.  Your magnificient ears can pick out one voice out of hundreds.  In court or a classroom, there are many times when multiple speakers will attempt to speak at one time.  Court reporters are able to distinguish between voices and even request that the speakers proceed one at a time.  This is one advantage over electronic recording devices.

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In a reverent homage to David Letterman, I offer up my Top Ten Steps to Steno Success.

Number 10: Just keep trying.
It's regular and steady effort that wins the steno race. Identify the weaknesses in your writing, and then work to conquer them. Have a daily plan that moves you one day closer to completing your training or meeting your steno goal. Remember that Mount Everest is climbed one step at a time. Make and keep a balanced practice plan. Work it! Even the best of plans will go awry. If you have a "bad day," then jump right back in the very next day. Hold yourself accountable for your progress.

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My time at the College of Court Reporting in Hobart, Indiana, ends at the Anoka County Courthouse in Anoka, Minnesota; seems strange. I came to Anoka County in March to start my first experience following an official reporter. One of my instructors, Janet Noel, set me up with a dear friend of hers who just happens to work there.

Honestly, it seems like I have waited forever for this opportunity. And now that it is here, I just want to turn my car around and drive back home to the comfort of my own home and announce that I have changed my mind, that I have decided a career in accounting would suit me better.

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College News

  • Hannah_Musgrave_May_2019_NewSize.jpg

    Alumni Spotlight - Hannah J. Musgrave

        College of Court Reporting (CCR) loves to share alumni stories because we are so proud of their accomplishments. Completing court reporting school can be a challenge.  Our alumni not only succeed in that endeavor but move ...

    by Mindi Billings
    Friday, 31 May 2019
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