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Student Essay - Jeff Moody's Four Step Process by Jessica Frizzell

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Student Essay - Jeff Moody's Four Step Process
by: Jessica Frizzell


Success is a process that requires time, practice, and dedication. As a court reporting student, I learned very quickly that an immense amount of dedication and commitment will be required in order to be successful. We learned early on that we would have to practice every day and that repetition is a key element to learning this unique language and skill. The old saying, “Practice makes perfect,” is incredibly valid in the field of court reporting. Although we may not be entirely perfect writers, even as a professional, practice and perseverance will make us very skilled and accurate writers. Using Jeff Moody’s “Four Step Process” while attempting self- evaluations and SAP evaluations will allow us to use perseverance through our schooling and ultimately create a learning experience with everything that we do.

When attempting a self-evaluation or SAP evaluation, the first step is to listen to the entire audio dictation. Sometimes, while taking these evaluations, it can be discouraging if you start to get behind the dictation and cannot keep up with the words. It is always tempting to just stop the audio and try a new one to see if that goes any better. However, this approach will only teach us to hesitate, and we will not be able to learn from the experience. I used to be a culprit of hesitating and trying so hard to catch up that I would end up with massive drops in my writing. If I fall behind while writing during dictation, I have learned to drop the words that I missed and pick up where the speaker is. This approach promotes and encourages endurance and to focus on the words you hear and the words you write. Listening to and attempting each self-evaluation or SAP evaluation in its entirety will teach me to devote all of my energy and concentration towards every word that is being dictated, ultimately preparing me for my career in the future.

The second and third steps involved in the four-step process are to transcribe and submit every self-evaluation and SAP evaluation attempted. Recently, I took an SAP in which I knew I had had some fairly significant drops. I seriously considered not transcribing and submitting it because I thought I would not pass it because of how many words I had dropped. However, I chose to transcribe it and submit it so I could evaluate what my hesitations were so I could learn from them. Transcribing SAPs, even when I think they won’t be a “pass,” has also taught me to read through my notes when they might be somewhat messy. In this way, I can see where I need to pay extra attention while I am practicing. All self-evaluations and SAP evaluations are truly learning experiences. Even if I may not earn a passing grade, this experience will allow me to redirect my focus to certain areas that require more attention.

Lastly, communication with my instructors is a vital piece to success in court reporting. During the SAP process, it is important to express my thoughts and experiences with my instructors. This will allow me to inform them of certain things I may struggle with or to ask them what I can do to work on certain areas of hesitation in my writing. Similarly, my instructors are also able to give me feedback on my SAP, so they can tell me what areas I need to focus on or what steps I should take next. Feedback given by instructors is incredibly valuable information that has truly helped me in my success so far and will ultimately help shape my success in court reporting.

I believe that “The Four-Step Process” is truly a great foundation in which to attempt self-evaluations and SAP evaluations in order to ultimately build my court reporting skills. It is so important to take every step, one at a time, in order to learn from everything we do school. Every class, practice session, and evaluation taken is a learning experience; we learn from our hesitations and focus on them in order to improve our skills and be successful. When it comes to court reporting, there is so much information to learn in what seems to be such little time. Practice, perseverance, and motivation will be key elements to becoming a successful court reporter.  

Jessica Frizzell
jessica.frizzell@ccr.edu

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